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101

25 April 1907 -- Born in Waubaushene, Ontario, Marie-"Velma"-Vatrina ARBOUR was the youngest of 6 daughters of lumber mill worker Napoleon ARBOUR and his wife Marie-Emma DUPUIS. Her parents likelywould have had more children, but Napoleondied when Velma was just one-year old. After her father's death, Emma married James GARRITY. During the Depression, this blended family moved to mining country in northern Ontario. It was here that Velma married in Timmins, ON, on 16 February1934, to James FELL. Velma and James had 4 children, 3 daughters and one son. James passed away sometime before 1996. Velma died between March 2000 and January 2003. It is unknown how many grandchildren they may have. 

ARBOUR Velma (7148I)
 
102

25 May 1910 -- Born in Waubaushene, Ontario, Mary-May ARBOUR was the 11th of 13 children of farmer, millhand, and general laborer Alfred-Joseph ARBOUR and his wife Mary THERRIEN. One month before her 18th birthday, May married 22-year oldJoseph Charles BOLYEA in Port Severn, ON, on 16 April 1928. Joe worked as a farmer and a mason in the local area. All of May and Joe's children were born in nearby North River, ON, but only 2 daughters and a son grew to adulthood: Yvonne, Burt, and Velma. May was 62 when she passed away in Toronto, ON, on 12 October 1973. Joe was 78 when he died in Coldwater, ON, on 04 October 1984. They were both buried in the City Cemetery in Coldwater, a town in which they had lived for many years. May and Joe can claim 11 grandchildren and at least 25 great-grandchildren. 

ARBOUR Marie May (5881I)
 
103

: At some point prior to 1891, Domithilde's natural parents -- Narcisse TALBOT and Marie-Louise PARENT -- must have died. She then came into the care of her Uncle George and Aunt Malvina. They became her parents and she lived with them the rest of her years. Like her mother and sister before her, Domithilde died young; she was just 17-years old when she passed away. 

ARBOUR-TALBOT Domithilde (7348I)
 
104

: At some point prior to 1891, Domithilde's natural parents -- Narcisse TALBOT and Marie-Louise PARENT -- must have died. She then came into the care of her Uncle George and Aunt Malvina. They became her parents and she lived with them the rest of her years. Like her mother and sister before her, Domithilde died young; she was just 17-years old when she passed away. 

ARBOUR Domithilde (7347I)
 
105

After their wedding, the young couple may have initially settled in Ste-Emelie-de-l'Energie but probably moved on after a short time. By 1911, they apparently lived in Labelle County, Quebec, and eventually had four sons and seven daughters. They also became godparents to nephew Donat BLAIS while still in Ste-Emelie in May 1905. 

ARBOUR Adelard (1269I)
 
106

As a young man, George travelled to Ontario and remained there for as much as couple of years. In June 1882, he was present at the wedding of his cousin Vercheres GREGOIRE in Port Severn, Ontario.He then apprarently returned to Quebec.

Shortly after their wedding, George and Malvina travelled to Ontario for a time. In June 1884, they were in Midland to act as godparents to George's cousin William ARBOUR. In 1887, a George ARBOURwas farming part of Concession 13, Lot 12,between Waubaushene and Port Severn. Perhaps he is our George, as there are not known to be any others in that area at this time.

By the middle of 1887, the young couple had returned to Quebec and seem to have stayed there for quite a while this time. They became godparents to nephew Philibert RIVET in June 1887 at St-Emelie-de-l'Energie. By April 1891, George and Malvina were known to be living in Quebec during the Census. That year George was reportedly a farmer living in St-Emelie-de-l'Energie. After this, George and Malvina again became godparents: to his cousin's daughter Anna ARBOUR in September 1891 and to his cousin's son Francois COUTU in January 1901, both in St-Emelie-de-l'Energie.

In April 1901, during the Census of that year, George and Malvina still lived in St-Emelie-de-l'Energie. They owned a four-room house plus three outbuildings on one-acre of the 2nd Range, JolietteCanton. George was reported to be a journeyman who earned $300 that year. George and Malvina are thought to have had no children of their own. No births have been connected to them. However, both in the 1891 Census and in the 1901 Census, they were recorded with niece Domitille TALBOT, the daughter of Malvina's sister Marie-Louise PARENT and her husband Narcisse TALBOT. They seem to have adopted the girl.

The story of the girl's parents is somewhat unclear. Marie-Louise and Narcisse appear to have married in about 1883. Their daughter Marie TALBOT was born on 16 October 1884 in St-Emelie-de-l'Energie and baptised there on 18 October 1884. Marie's stillborn twin was also born there on the 16th; this baby was buried on 20 October 1884. One year later, on 27 October 1885, Domitille TALBOT was bornalthough her baptismal record has not yet been located. Young Marie TALBOT must havenot been a healthy child as she died in St-Emelie-de-l'Energie just three years later on 19 December 1883 and was buried there on 23 December 1887. Perhaps it was shortly after this that Marie-Louise and/or Narcisse passed away - although they were not buried in St-Emelie-de-l'Energie - and Domitille came under the care of her Uncle George and Aunt Malvina. The complete explanation for their situation may never be known.

In later years, George and Malvina again returned to the baptismal font at St-Emelie-de-l'Energie to hold more godchildren: George's cousin Jeanne Domitille MORIN in May 1904 and George's cousin Georges Gerald LASALLE in August 1912. 

ARBOUR Georges (1966I)
 
107

As a young man, Joseph worked as a journeyman. Later in his life he became a blacksmith like his father before him. Throughout all their years, he and his family lived in Joliette City. In 1901, the family lived at 50 Arthemise Street, where they rented a five-room house on ¼ acre. Joseph earned $400 that year. 

ARBOUR Joseph (4816I)
 
108

By the Census of 1901, Olivier seems to have passed away. His family still lived in Oka and still operated the general store that he founded. They owned a 10-room house on 1/2 acre with 2 outbuildings. His widow and eldest three daughtersran the store, which was located next door to the local Catholic Church, which in turn was next door to the local schoolhouse. 

ARBOUR Adelard (3904I)
 
109

Elide was about 14-years old when she moved with her family from Quebec to Ontario. As a young woman, Elide became godmother to three children in Midland: cousin Oscar ARBOUR in July 1888, nephew Omer RIVET in June 1890, and cousin's daughter Ethel BOURDON in August 1891. She also witnessed her brother William's marriage in April 1891 in Waubaushene.

After their wedding, Elide and Bert settled in Waubaushene, where they had five children, three daughters and two sons. They also served as godparents to nephew Louis ARBOUR in January 1907 and toniece Emilie ARBOUR in March 1907, both inMidland. In 1901, the young family with two small children was living in a four-room house on ¼ acre of Concession 10, Lot 10, in Waubaushene. Bert earned $270 that year at the mill. While Elide and Bert did have five children, they seem tohave had just a lone granddaughter who married. As a result, the BRODEUR name ended on this line. 

ARBOUR Elide Emelie (3493I)
 
110

From his cousin Bud O'REILLY via email on 25 Mar 2008: I assume his army training was in Saskatchewan where they would meet and fall in love. They moved to Port Robinson, about 5 miles north of Welland, Ontario, on the Welland Canal, justdown the road from his sister Mae Jalbert and across the road from his cousin Laura (Gouin) O'Reilly, my mother. I have a picture of him in his army uniform taken beside our house in Port Robinson. Theresa Arbour lived with Roy Ladouceur across the Canal lift bridge a few yards down the road. Alphage Arbour (Alf lived with wife Marjorie (Karr) across the road from Wilf. . . . We were always taught to address my mother's cousins as Uncle Wilf, Aunt Alice, Aunt Mae, and Uncle Wee (Mae's husband Wilson Jalbert). The Arbours and their kin always had interesting nick-names such as Wee, Pep, Nazz, etc. 

ARBOUR Wilfred (3938I)
 
111

From Linda RHODE via Algoma Co Message Board on 07 Apr 2009: There are 2 Arbours in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery. The Ontario Genealogical society has indexed this cemetery and they have Blanche MinnieArbour and Samuel Lloyd Arbour both listedwith stone reference number 1519. There are no dates or other info given. 

SOUCY Blanche Minerva (74299I)
 
112

From Linda RHODE via Algoma Co Message Board on 07 Apr 2009: There are 2 Arbours in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery. The Ontario Genealogical society has indexed this cemetery and they have Blanche MinnieArbour and Samuel Lloyd Arbour both listedwith stone reference number 1519. There are no dates or other info given. 

ARBOUR Lioyd (5316I)
 
113

He seems to have lived at a boys' school during the 1911 Census taken in June of that year. --> From Denis ARBOUR via email on 25 Nov 2009: I am quite sure it's the "Collège de L'Assomption." Back then, a "collège" was a high-school administered by a religious order. The students were permanent residents and had to obey very strict rules and were on a very tight schedule. 

ARBOUR Joseph-Alphonse-"Zebedee" (4997I)
 
114

Helen Arbour was born on 16 August 1920, in St Louis, Michigan, as Helen Palko. She was born to two immigrants who both came here through Ellis Island from Czechoslovakia. Her father was Michael Palko, born in Prague, CZ, on 24 August 1885 (died January 1963), and her mother was Appolonia Pavoliç, born in Prague, CZ, on 11 January 1899 (died 12 January 1990). Her parents lived on their 40-acre farm until both of them passed away. Helen lived at the farm from the time she was12. Prior to that, the family lived in a multitude of places. Helen had several siblings. When the war came, she became a "Rosie the Riveter". She worked at the Willow Run plant building the B-24J Liberator, a bomber, from 1941 until 1944. 

PALKO Helen Mary (63276I)
 
115

In 1871, Charles and Odile lived a few miles away from St Come in St-Emelie-de-l'Energie, along with many of his brothers. The family was still there in 1881, in 1891, and in 1901. In 1886, Charles received a Land Grant for property in Joliette County from the Canadian Government. The farmer and his wife eventually had 11 children, six daughters and five sons. The family of seven of them was listed in the 1891 Census in St-Emelie-de-l'Energie, with son William living next door. In 1901, they owned a five-room house plus three outbuildings on 303 acres, next door to his brother Joseph ARBOUR and not too far away from their son William ARBOUR. Charles and Odile held quite the position of honor within their family, as evidenced by the fact that they were chosen to become godparents ten times. Their godchildren were nephew Alphonse ARBOUR in November 1868, nephew Charles HOULE in August 1870, niece Marie ARBOUR in July 1872, nephew Severe LASALLE in October 1873, niece Marie-Diana ARBOUR in May 1882, grandson Hermenegilde ARBOUR in July 1898, great-nephew Edouard BEAUDOIN in February 1906, granddaughter Rosianne ARBOUR in July 1908, grandson Hermenegilde ARBOUR in December 1908, and grandsonAvila ARBOUR in May 1909. Sadly, Charles was also witness to four funerals, including one for a godson: niece Exerine ARBOUR died in June 1884, greatnieces Anna and Rosianne ARBOUR died in February 1897, and grandson and godson Hermenegilde ARBOUR died in August 1898. 

ARBOUR Charles (1579I)
 
116

In 1901, Charles still lived with his parents in Waubaushene. The teenager earned $154 that year at the mill. In January 1903, he witnessed his brother Baptiste's wedding in Victoria Harbour. In October 1906, he witnessed his sister Delia's wedding, also in Victoria Harbour.

Charles and Lina had a son, Edward, who was born in Victoria Harbour. They also seem to have taken in a son of the family, who became known as Uncle Fred. Later, the family moved to northern Ontario and settled in the North Bay area in 1929.

Charles lived at 363 Aberdeen Avenue at the time of his death in 1966. He died in a local hospital as the result of a heart attack following a lengthy illness. While he actually attended the Pro-Cathedral of the Assomption Church, he was buried in St Mary's Cemetery in North Bay. Lina predeceased him at some point. 

ARBOUR Charles (1610I)
 
117

In about 1928, 15-year old "Etta" moved with her family from Victoria Harbour to Toronto, where she had the chance to grow up in the big city. As a young woman, Etta stood witness at the weddings of three of her brothers: Louis married inSeptember 1932, Lloyd married in November 1934, and Theo married in June 1941. Just seven months later, Etta married for herself. 

ARBOUR Marie Henriette (5811I)
 
118

Joseph and Alphonsine had nine children, three daughters and six sons, three of whom died in infancy. They also became godparents to his cousin Regina HOULE, who was baptised in May 1880 at St-Emelie-de-l'Energie. While living in St-Emelie-de-l'Energie, Joseph toiled as a farmer. As his parents' only child, he became the caretaker of their property, as well as his own. In 1886, Joseph receiveda Land Grant from the Canadian Government for some property in Joliette County, but the details are unknown. One day while working, Joseph decided that there must be a more successful life elsewhere.So following in the many footsteps of ARBOURs before him, he travelled across the country and became a lumberer in Ontario. In the winter of 1898-1899, Joseph went to Northern Ontario to work and found a lovely spot on Lake Nipissing. He then saved his money in order to bring his family and his parents there. So in the spring of 1899, the whole group arrived on the train in Verner, Ontario; they then continued on to Lavigne, Ontario. In 1901, the family was indeed found living in MacPherson Township, Ontario, which is where the community of Lavigne is located within Nipissing District. That year, Joseph and his three eldest surviving sons worked their farm. 

ARBOUR Edouard (3461I)
 
119

Narcisse was about nine-years old when he moved with his family from Quebec to Ontario. After their wedding, Narcisse and Mary Jane settled in Waubaushene, where their first two children were born. They then moved to Victoria Harbour in about 1898. In 1901, the family owned a three-room house on ¼ acre of Concession 7, Lot W13, in Victoria Harbour. Narcisse earned $320 that year at the mill. The couple eventually shared a family of five children, two daughters and three sons,and were also godparents to five nieces and nephews: Norman ARBOUR in Midland in March 1897, Mary Ann RIVET in Midland in April 1897, Louis Herbert ARBOUR in Midland in February 1908, Emma ARBOUR in Waubaushene in July 1908, and Lloyd ARBOURin Midland in May 1910. Between the Census of April 1901 and the birth of their daughter in December 1904, Narcisse became a butcher. It is believed that he ran the butcher shop which was located adjacted to the grocery store owned by the BRODEUR family on Richard Street in Victoria Harbour, near St Mary's Church. Narcisse later took his son Isadore out of school at a young age so he could work in the shop, increasing production and affording his siblings the opportunity for aneducation. Mary Jane was just 44-years old when she died at their home in Victoria Harbour. Son Isadore forever remembered his mother with only love and admiration. However, Narcisse was not always known to be such a faithful family man, although dear Mary Jane never knew this. Sometime after Mary Jane's death, Narcisse remarried to a woman named Philomene LORMAND, who was a sister to Delia, who married Narcisse's brother Thomas. She was also a sister to John, who married Narcisse's cousin Delia. Narcisse and Philomene then had a daughter of their own, who was born in 1925. 

ARBOUR Narcisse Arsene (3906I)
 
120

Note: After their wedding, Seraphin and Elisabeth settled in Ste-Emelie-de-l'Energie, where they lived through 1913. By 1915, they had moved to St-Ignace-du-Lac, Quebec. In January 1941, they lived in Ste-Marcelline, Quebec. Seraphin and Elisabeth eventually had 13 children. They also became godparents to niece Raymonde-Lucille BEAUDOIN in January 1941 in Ste-Emelie-de-l'Energie. 

ARBOUR Séraphin (1293I)
 
121

Note: After their wedding, the young couple settled in St-Emelie-de-l'Energie, where they eventually had eight children, four daughters and four sons. In 1901, they lived on the St Catherine's Concession on the property of Medard LASALLE and Lea TELLIER, who were Thomas' cousins. They rented a two-room house and Thomas earned $150 that year as a carpenter. The family lived in St-Emelie-de-l'Energie through 1913, but appear to have moved away some time after this although it is not clear where they may have gone.[ArbourBook] 

ARBOUR Thomas Leonide (1658I)
 
122

Note: Alfred was employed for over 25 years by McGibbons Lumber Company. In 1944, he went to work for the Copeland Flour Mill in Midland. Throughout his adult years, Alfred also served on the Penetanguishene Fire Brigade, eventually becoming its Deputy Chief. 

ARBOUR Alfred (2682I)
 
123

Note: During his life, Edouard was known to work as an artisan and as a farmer. Edouard and Parmelia eventually had five children, but two of them died in infancy and one in childhood. They also served as godparents to nephew Edouard ARBOUR in February 1911 and to his cousin's son Edouard ARBOUR in September 1914, both of whom were baptised at St-Emelie-de-l'Energie. In later years, Edouard was again called upon to hold two family youngsters at the St-Emelie-de-l'Energie baptismal font: granddaughter Alice AUMOND in January 1928 and grandson Gilles ARBOUR in March 1932. 

ARBOUR Edouard (1499I)
 
124

Note: From son Allan ARBOUR (via Linda CHARRON on 10 Oct 2005): Grandpa was a hockey player. He played hockey for Victoria Harbour, Midland, Westinghouse in Hamilton, and Toronto Stockyards. He came from a hockey family. His brother Armosplayed on the Montreal Canadians Stanley Cup winning team in 1916. He also had cousins that played professional hockey. While living in Hamilton, he was in aserious car accident, and suffered head injuries. He had to have a metal plate inserted in his head. That ended his hockey career. He was also a good ball player in his day. He used to enjoy going down to the ball field and watch the ball games. He married Theresa Bourrie on 28 December 1936, They had 4 children Mary Jane, Allan, Eva, and Lucille. Grandpa worked in the family Butcher Shop until it was sold. He was sick and had suffered a heart attack at a very early age. He went to work at a butcher shop in Waubaushene until he became very ill. Grandpa passed away 21 December 1967. It was unfortunate that you weren't old enough to know Grandpa. He spoke French fluently and would often sing little french songs. He also liked playing cards. He was a teaser and such a likeable person, he wasloved by everyone. He is sadly missed and fondly remembered. 

ARBOUR Francois Lawrence Joseph (1676I)
 
125

Note: Isadore's father was a butcher in Victoria Harbour. At a very young age, Isadore was taken out of school to work in the shop, which allowed his brothers and sister the chance for an education, but denied him that same fate 

ARBOUR Isidore Louis (4419I)
 

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